Characters (update)

Moving into the character concept development phase and it’s been going pretty well. Starting to see how the players will take to the stage and height differences. E.g. where does someone’s elbow line up next to another character.

Also, nice excursion to a local Japanese tea house will get the creative hubbub roaring. Highlights included Pu erh, Lapsang Suchong, and a nice matcha. Yes, that’s three teapots going at once.

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In otter sketching news…

Working on secondary characters. This otter-ly friendly character is going to appear more on the second half of the novel. Worked through preliminary sketches for general personality and facial expression. Main emotional palette is bouncing between happy/laughing/smiling, ADHD distracted, and at times melancholic. Great character to really get a chance to do justice. The otter’s sideburns is befitting.

Character Development :: Building up

In certain scenarios, if you’re uneasy in how to replicate a character, start with the basic geometric, shapes or forms. If you have access to underlying skeletal features… even better! Next, start to add details. Lastly, finalize with stronger linework.

Muscle memory of the underlying forms and structures will allow for an easier flow of how the skin atop it naturally falls or covers the skull, bones, or muscles. 

Getting Motivated & Organized : The Storyline

Of all things that are most dubious, daunting or otherwise… none compare to the storline. If your jazzed about it, the complexity and excitement shows. If it’s just straight ‘meh’… it will get amplified. And if you’re in my boat…it’s downright terrifying (but in a good way).

Consider your own fears (for better or worse) an excellent reason to get motivated or view them as an opportunity for some good ol’fashion introspection. With the right amount of the stuff and harnessing it correctly, fear (or rather the urge to overcome it) can prove a to be a powerful ally.

Stepping Up to the Plate: The Storyline The storyline for the graphic novel of my mine is just about laid out. Some authors use post its, cue cards,  notecards…or just binders of scrap paper thrown together. Use whatever the method works for you. 

Those little index notecards just happen to be the right size for the sections of the narrative. Some sections happen to be more full, others… not so much. But good writing should be a blend of both a slower pace sequences matched near faster paced.

Consider your favorite piece of writing (or yarn, flick or graphic novel). There’s a pacing, a rhythm, a sort of melody in the way events and characters happen. 

The cool thing about index cards is that you can shuffle them around and rewrite or reorganize them without getting too overattached to them*. The flexibility is a happy sandbox for which you can really play around with.

*(The majority of good writers have the common advice of “not getting married to the first idea but rather having it be a springboard for new ideas”. Also, unless your James Joyce, your first go’round will be pretty raw/cruddy to begin with. Gotta start somewhere though! )